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Response Landing Page

The Importance of Updating Your Website for COVID-19

Whether you’re hosting a webinar, giving away a special report, selling a program, or presenting a video series, a landing page inspires your visitors to participate in some way.

Creating a crisis response landing page is a bit different because you’re not trying to convert leads into sales-you’re trying to communicate serious messaging to your customers.

Why should you put up a separate crisis-related page? Your visitors are looking for reassurance and resources, whether it’s around health precautions you’re taking to prevent the spread of coronavirus or changes to your opening hours. It’s important for your small business to have a crisis response plan, and a big part of that is messaging.

Such as coffee chain JJ Bean talking about their gradual reopening.

What Is a Landing Page?

It’s simply a website page, but it often looks different from your typical website. It has a primary focus-a single “call to action” or focused objective that you want your visitors to pay attention to.

It’s all about keeping the visitor focused on that main objective: your response to COVID-19.

The Dos & Don’ts of Creating a COVID-19 Landing Page

Click-through website pages are designed to convince the visitor to click through to another page.

This is often done on an eCommerce site, where a marketing campaign will send people to a click-through website pages and provide engaging details about a specific program, product or service. There will be a button that will lead people to buy whatever you’re selling.

If you have a call to action on your COVID-19 response landing page, make sure it’s sensitive and relevant. For example, if you provide counselling services or sell wellness-related items consumers are looking for during this time, it’s fine to show people how to access your offerings.

For example, The Broken Whisk Restaurant has a COVID-19 landing page letting people know about their Heat and Serve Meal Program offered while closed.

However, if your small business sells completely unrelated items, don’t clutter your informational website pages with them. The rest of your website can do that; save your COVID-19 landing page for informational purposes. This communication is part of your pandemic response plan, not a sales pitch.

The same goes for lead generation. Marketers use lead generation website pages to capture the name, email address and perhaps other info (like a phone number or occupation) to enter it into a database list, which is stored in a newsletter platform service.

Then, that database list can be used to follow up with people who signed up, either through an autoresponder series, promotional campaign or other newsletter sendout.

You’ll want to avoid having a signup form on your COVID-19 response landing page. Even if you have coronavirus-specific resources to share, now’s not the time to be trying to grab leads from a page like this.

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